The New York Times
Date: 2011-11-29
Author: Ginia Bellafante

Article Mentions
Author, Ginia Bellafante
Mentioned, Gloria Vanderbilt
Mentioned, Norman Mailer
Mentioned, Holly Golightly
Mentioned, Big Glasses
Mentioned, Playboy
Mentioned, Hollywood
Norman Mailer famously called Truman Capote the most perfect writer of his generation, saying of Breakfast at Tiffanys that he would not change two words. The 1961 film that came out three years after the novels publication of course changed many words, siphoning off the books abiding spirit of melancholy. When I encountered it for the first time, years ago, just out of college, I felt a race of fury over the liberties and licenses Hollywood had taken in its rendering. Hollys profession is hardly glossed over in the novel, and her neighbor, the books unnamed narrator, does not and cannot provide her with a happy ending. Im interested in hearing from all of you, but especially from those who have just read the book for the first time, presum...(read more)
... Norman Mailer famously called Truman Capote the most perfect writer of his generation, saying of Breakfast at Tiffanys that he would not change two words. The 1961 film that came out three years after the novels publication of course changed many wor ...
... ? The beautiful New Yorker writer Maeve Brennan? From the 50s through the early 70s, Brennan wrote the Long Winded Lady column for that magazine. Like Holly, she was in possession of childlike eccentricities, an air of elusiveness and a devotion to b ...


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