Los Angeles Times
Date: 2012-01-01
Author: Scott Timberg, Special To The Los Angeles Times

Article Mentions
Author, Scott Timberg, Special To The Los Angeles Times
Mentioned, John Baldessari
Mentioned, Ed Ruscha
Mentioned, Maurice Tuchman
Mentioned, Irving Blum
Mentioned, Dennis Hopper
Mentioned, David Hockney
Mentioned, Virginia Dwan
Mentioned, Bruce Nauman
Mentioned, Andy Warhol
Mentioned, Craig Kauffman
Mentioned, Ed Kienholz
Mentioned, Molly Barnes
Mentioned, Billy Al Bengston
Mentioned, Peter Plagens
Mentioned, LACMA
Mentioned, Bentley
Mentioned, Art In America
Mentioned, The Museum of Contemporary Art
It's hard to imagine now. But one fact about the early years of the post-World War II art scene in Los Angeles that has been brought into focus by the Pacific Standard Time initiative is that there was no real art museum in what was becoming the nation's second largest city. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art did not exist as a separate entity until it opened on Wilshire Boulevard in 1965. The Museum of Contemporary Art's Grand Avenue location was years away. Much of the energy, then, in the city's art scene in the 1945 to 1980 stretch came from private collectors, artists' collectives, print shops, art schools and especially from commercial galleries. A handful are talked about with the most conviction. "When you look back at a mountain ...(read more)
... It's hard to imagine now. But one fact about the early years of the post-World War II art scene in Los Angeles that has been brought into focus by the Pacific Standard Time initiative is that there was no real art museum in what was becoming the nati ...
... David Stuart represented Dennis Hopper. Two of the period's other key galleries were despite the machismo of much of the art scene run by women. Ferus' chief rival was Virginia Dwan, heiress to a founder of the Minnesota-based conglomerate 3M, who ...


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